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20131210
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violent cities in america to see how technology can help us fight crime? >> that's right. i went to oakland, california which has the 5th highest crime rate and nearby richmond which is among the top 20 to look at some very innovative technology that they are looking to increase the eyes and ears of the police force on the street. so let's have a look these are streets. >> i am not violating any law. >> in two san francisco bay area cities known for crime oakland and rimmond westbound. >> but now, police in both of these cities have high tech back-ups. electronic ears listening for gunfire, 24/7. he lectronic eyes monitoring police and perps alike. even the cars on this street. officer chris tong is patrolling the streets of richmond that. ding you hear is the sound of a license plate reader. watch what happens when he passes a stolen vehicle. >> it's just triggered on an unoccupied vehicle. turn around and take a look what we've got here. >> the unoccupied vehicle was a stolen nissan sentra caught by the high-speed infrared camera, a series of computer algorithims identified the
head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to look at technology to test helmets and track hits on college and youth players. let's take a look. . >>> homecoming in the heartland. this is cornhusker county. nebraska university, the epicentre of college football. >> first big win. >> along with the tradition of football - come the hits. cheer cheer >> big hits like this one in front of our cameras. no one knows how hard the hits can be better than blak
with the tract. >> have they talked about technology, right, that may have prevented -- actually prevented the crash, can you tell us about that? >> it's called positive train control, it is a very sophisticating technology. it uses computers, and gps satellite sensors on the track. a central control system. could that have helped here? we asked ntsb board member about that. seven. >> which is a technical name for a system that prevents trains from occupying the same set of tracks. it does provide signals for the train to slow. question don't know if that would have made a difference, we will be looking at that. >> now, congress has man tated that positive train control be on the runs by the end of 2015, but a number of rail lines including the one involved in this accident, have said they will not meet that deadline. lisa appreciate it. this afternoon, it happens we will of course bring you live updates. now to asia. where vice president has voiced strong opposition to the new defense zone in the east china sea. >> we are deeply concerned by the attempt to unilaterally change the status q
and cutting edge combat and cutting edge technology that can help to technology that can help to detect a concussion before detect a concussion before it's it's too late. too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. operative. she was packaging that can one she was packaging that can one day replace day replace polysterene. polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. behaviours. i'm i'm phil torres, i study insects phil torres, i study insects in peru. in peru. that's our team. that's our team. let's do some science. let's do some science. ♪ music ] ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. settle a lawsuit. what was it about. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. concus
, it's often said if you want to understand the latest piece of technology you should ask a child. but a new survey suggests that there is a price to be paid. let's go back to lauren. >> that's right. children may be one step ahead of their parents when it comes to the latest gadgets but it comes at a cost of traditional skills such as handwriting or spelling. >> it's playtime at this nursery, and these toddlers are exercising their coloring and drawing skills. they're also learning to cut and paste. not just with paper and glue but on computers. with technology being a central part of every day life they need to figure out how to point and click. >> this daycare facility in west london has a special technology course for children once a week. they learn on computers like this. by the time they reach school age they know how to navigate a keyboard and a computer mouse. but there are concerns that the early use of tablets and computers is making it difficult for children to learn tasks like using a pen and pencil and the use of a computer makes it difficult for children to learn ne
. >> hassan rouhani described the pursuit of nuclear technology as a definite right, and said that iran has a right to live without sanctions. >>> demonstrators of ukraine are back on the street after reports of a meeting between its president and the russian president vladimir putin. the meetings sparked fears that ukraine would agree to deals with the russians rather than the european union. >> there are reports that there have been deals signed with russia worth $174 million of aid. ukraine needs this money simply to pay its creditors. it's reserves are start to go run low and it is in dire economic circumstances. these reports are unconfirmed yet they spread more angrier gons th angs demonstrators because of the it's president failed to sign a deal with the e.u. and sunday they are planning a big one. they want to repeat the successful mobilization that they had last weekend here. and they desperately need to keep this momentum going because they know if they mail to do that, then president yanukovych may well hang on to power with moscow's help. >> keep it there. we have much more com
specializes in technology policy. and emma, director of the free expression project. and joy spencer joins us from the digital center for democracy. and katie is assistant edit of slate who has been critical of eraser laws. meg, explain the thought process behind laws like the one we just saw get signed in california. why are these types of laws being proposed? >> things that we are seeing, a general fear, of this permanent record, we're all creating these permanent records, and for adults that starts at an age where there is a level of understanding of how this content is going to be understood and accepted. but a large percent, i think 90% of two-year-olds has an online presence. now we're seeing permanent records starting at a very young age. obviously if they're two years old, it's their parents putting up the content, and it goes on throughout the life of the user. >> generally do you like the idea of what these laws are trying to do? >> i do. i think they're intended to protect the development of kids through this very vital identi identity--identity process that is natural, good for th
accident and the new technology that could reduce the chance of disaster. on al jazeera america and join the conversation online @ajamstream. >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. >> two former police officers are now on trial for beating the -- the beating death of a mentally ill homeless man in california. [screaming. >> the officers are facing charges from involuntary manslaughter to murder in the death of kelly thomas. two years ago, officers were seen on video punching and kicking the man at a bus depot. they say the man had been acting violently. another camera caught the rea
example of an employer using technology to increase productivity. we either workers are working harder for the same output or fewer amount of hours are being worked for the same amount of output. >> richard, could you make a case that people paying a quarter or a buck extra because it helps the niya potts of the world? >> is absolutely does. i think one of the things that the records show and the studies show is that increased minimum wage, in particularly at times like this when there has been so much wage stagnation, and so much pent up demand will lead to increased consumer confidence, increased consumer spending and that in turn translates to additional jobs as more successful economy for everyone. by the way, we can look back in history and see in 1968, for example, the minimum wage in real dollar terms or in fixed dollars terms would be $9.44 now. and the unemployment is less than half of what it is today. the notion that minimum wage destroys jobs is disproved. and when you think about it, the common sense that says people at the lower end of the income spectrum are going to spe
and derailed in bridgeport, connecticut. some experts argue that the technology exists and could help prevent deadly accidents like sunday's derailment. jake ward joins us from san francisco with that. jake, what sort of technology are we talking about? >> john, it's called a positive control system. positive train control is where the ntsb i has been pushing for0 years. the combination of gps sensors, sensors in the tracks, control sensors and remote control in the trains to compensate when a driver has been disabled, incapacitated or not paying attention. >> is there any difference between passenger trains and freight trains and the technology that they have? >> well, the difference really has to do with just how incredibly dangerous a train can be depending on what it's carrying. we've seen in new york the dangerous situation where trains are full the people. but even trains without people on board canner dangerous. in 2005 in south carolina, there was a terrible crash in which a tanker full of chlorine basically atomized in the air and a cloud of this poisonous gas caused the evacuation o
and technology. >>> many americans do their investing exclusive italy through mutual funds and retirement plans and some of them are increasingly worried that 401s will not carry them through retirement. some are moving through funds in rand out like a trader buys and sells stocks. this is getting a thumbs up from some investors but a thumbs down from financial investors who guide money. >> she figures she'd need 4 million to have a financially secure retirement. >> top of my list, china, new zealand, africa, antarctica, i want to be able to go freely and not pinch pennies. >> sandy who does not believe social security will be around has been saving money for nearly 20 years. even though she paid close attention to the markets and actively managed the fund she realized the rate her money was going she wouldn't have enough for her golden years. >> i'm not going to save $4 million out of what i don't spend on food and shelter. it's not going to happen. it has to blow. >> in search of moss growth sandy found the service called horizon. gives clients customized molly trading advice for retirement p
technology is changing. what's next in online shopping. >> the woman behind the most read peace ever joining me on her day job. . > >>> . >>> welcome to al-jazeera america, iran's foreign minister is trying to assure leaders in the gulf states that a nuclear deal signed in geneva is in the region's best interest. my colleague sat down with the foreign minister who told him, iran will adhere to the proposed guidelines. >> iran will continue its enrichment at 5%, and iran will continue construction work at iraq. iran has agreed not to do certain activities that fall within the scope of this timetable and this plan of action. we have also agreed to provide specific rather thanniarrangeme eiea for them to continue. in fact, in most cases continue monitoring our activities. >> zar if praised the government of iran for helping iran and other world leaders reach the agreement. a judge sentenced a hospital worker to 39 years in prison for infecting dozens of patients with hepatitis c, david kwykowski admitted to stealing painkillers and replacing them. he was a cardiac technologist before his arrest
the deal for reduced economic sanctions. he describe the pursuit nuclear technology was, quote a definite and feels that iran has the right to live without sanctions. >> china is on high alert. the "world health organization" says since march of this year there has been a search for the bird flu in hong kong. >> when there is an infection. the infection is very serious. >> that's why hong kong has shut down it's poultry markets. while will is no evidence that the h 7 n 9 strain spreads from human to human. there are fears that i there isa potential for a pan democrat. >> okay. they're taking this very seriously. this strain of influenza of birds often does not make the birds sick. you can't follow the sick. >> i see the front lines of vaccine research for the strain over in china funded by the national institute of health there is a team of a dozen doctors and scientists working to find a real vaccine to treat people around the world. >> dr. katherine edwards joined that search. >> the chinese were very good about sharing the virus with the with who and with the cdc so we could begin to
church. for years the national transportation safety board wants technology to prevent derailments caused by excessive speed and in 2008 congress passed a law giving railroad until 2015 for positive control systems and they are designed to prevent human error which is the cause of 40% of train accidents. but since they are pretty expensive and a bit complicated to install, railroads want to push back the deadline by 5-7 years. but metro north is actually in the process of installing such a system and currently it does have an automatic train control system in place which allows the train to apply the brakes even if an engineer does not respond to an excessive speed alert. that train was headed to new york's grand central terminal where al jazeera's jennifer glass is covering the delays. jennifer do you have any idea when the trains will be backup and running? >> no, morgan, we don't. we know the transit authority will want to get them running as soon as possible because it's the second biggest line in the country and 26,000 on the hudson line which was effected but metropolitan are expect
, hey, we need more work? >> technological we haven't had many issues. what is critical for us is educating the consumer about how healthcare works, how health insurance works, and how the tax credits work. because that's what makes somebody a knowledgeable consumer. that's what we want. that's what we need when people come on down site. >> that depends on advertising, promotions and getting people to go to the site in the first place. are the numbers on the connecticut site what you thought would be? >> they are, but what is past is past. we did fine the last couple of months, but we're looking for december to get us up over 60,000 members if we can. because at the end of the year, before the january 1st time frame. so yeah, what's past is hopefu hopefully prologued for us. but december is going to be very busy. >> what is the information that consumers should have on hand when they go to the connecticut website and where do consumers run into trouble with just their own information? >> gee, that's a great question. understanding about your family make up, when i say that, soc
ambassador says drone technology is becoming commonplace, not much more sophisticated than a toy model aircraft. he believes the u.n. will use many more of them. >> translation: other missions are saying, "we will need drones that would improve protection of soldiers to see if threats are out there and ensure protection of civilians." >> for now the u.n., and the drones in the congo are a one off. their effectiveness is being closely monitored. >> the democratic republic of congo has claimed close to 300 lives, some as a direct result because of disease and malnutrition. the vatican is refusing a request about clenchy sexually abusing children. a survey was sent asking about details of abuse cases. the vatican said such information is confidential. the holly seer will not reveal the information unless requested by government or state for league at processing proceedings. >>> pope francis will meet with the cardinal he picked to help reform the church. it's the second day of church. a church spokesperson says they are working on an indepth revision. six continents are represented on the
jazeera, kabul, afghanistan. >> the world's biggest technology companies are demanding to u.s. surveillance laws. they have written an open letter to president obama and they say the government needs to preserve people's trust in the internet. what are they demanding and are they proposing reforms. >> reporter: that's a good question, but first what they're demanding from the u.s. government is five principles to be respected. the core principles is the end to the mass data collecting. we've learned from edward snowdon is the collecting and storing. they say that has to end. there has to be more of a legal framework and more accountability and transparency about these operations. they're very worried. these internet companies say they're worried as a result customers around the world simply aren't going to use their services if there is going to be a direct line to the government. as you suggested there are questions that aren't addressed. for stars, why do these companies collect so much information about us in the first place. maybe if they didn't collect so much informat
to discuss amazon's vision for drone technology is tech crunch writer, alex wilhelm. great to speak to you. what do you think about this? what's the potential here? the applications? is this fundamentally down the road a few years a game changer? >> yeah. well, they are very confident this will happen. you have to realize the scale of amazon. they don't do things in small ways. if they are going to deploy this, they are going to do it on a wide scale. presuming the technology advances as it has internally at am zon and the f.a.a. gets it in place, i don't see how this doesn't come very large in about five years. >> how about some of the issues here, the drawbacks, the idea of hacking into those things? those things falling out of the sky, liability. >> fear mongering. >> what do you thing? >> amazon is a smart company. they built awv, the backbone of much of the internet. i am pretty sure they can build a drone that can't be hacked. these are small issues compared to what technology could do for consumers. >> usual not worried about this thing being hacked by one of us? you are worried abo
, modern technology. it begs the question of will we see bitcoin as a frequently accepted mode of payment in the future? >> i think we could. when the infrastructure is in place and the merchant accepts it, it's more security than a credit card payment. it's a matter of having those things in place and having people understand how it works. >> do you think there will be the technology, you can make these transfers and it's simple to do? >> it's that way right now. again, the matter is how universal it is, how often people have heard of it, accept it and are willing to take it for their business. right now, that's the limiting factor, not the technology, itself. >> when bitcoin or when you started your travels, bitcoin was worth about $100. right now, it's inflated. there is a big bubble going on. it may be a bubble, but it's over a thousand dollars. did you ever think maybe i should have saved that bitcoin? >> i don't because really, i went into this wanting to learn more about it. the rise in value of bitcoin just begs the question even more: is this viable as a currency if it's rising
to put you in handcuffs. >> now the innovative technology that can spot a stolen car parked in the middle of a city block. >> there were multiple gunshots fired. >> it can track a gunman thousands of miles away. >> if you can track it then you can predict it. >>> severe winter storms are causing power outages and caused so much trouble with traffic across the country. temperatures in north dakota plunged to 20 degrees below zero over the weekend. winter weather advisories are in effect from vermont to virginia as the system moves east. we have more on all of this weather across the country. jaleel la. >> the conditions across washington, d.c. to new york city are alley deteriorating. look at the traffic cam right now. the roadways empty. they should be empty. look at that snow piled up on the roadways. that's the scene in washington, d.c. very different scene in new york city. cloudy skies for sure. don't worry, the snow and the sleet is on the way, and temperatures are going to plummet as we track on into the evening hours. take a look at the map here behind me. as a matter of fact, this
in the lower income groups. >> and trying to keep up technology. the senate working on a plastic gun ban. >> reporter: this is something that has been in place since the reagan administration, but gun control advocates say there is a problem. what has to happen, any gun that is predominantly made of plastic has to have a metal part to make it secure. one problem is that that metal, that piece of metal under current law can be easily detached. for any reason someone would want to do something like than there is a proposal to make that put in plastic guns. that's likely to fail. >> and you and i know that they will take their vacation , but t seems to america that congress is doing less and less and they're on vacation more and more. >> reporter: when you include the post office namings, and profunctory items, in there is no question. they come in for two days a week. you put it all together they might be here for six months out of the year. they're expected to spend five hours a day at the d this, c or rnc on the phone dialing for dollars, and much of the legislation you see in congress h
safe and secure in south africa. >>> car pile ups massive air delays. >>> and major technology companies joining forces to battle the nsa. >>> president obama is on his way to south africa. he is heading the u.s. delegation honoring nelson mandela. the president leaving on air force one just a few hours ago. former president george w. bush and his wife laura are also on board joining first lady michelle obama and the president. president's clinton and carter will attend the service scheduled for tuesday in south africa. george r. h.w bush is the only former president that will not be there. >>> alan is near johannesburg. he has more on how the people of south africa are remembering nelson mandela. and he's a father figure being honored in cities large and small 1234 absolutely, del, and people here and in nelson mandela square in the rain at 7:00 in south africa, a soggy evening, but it doesn't seem to offend the crowds much. they have been coming here constantly to the many tribute centers set up around the country for nelson mandela. now this is a very ritzy mall. this is rea
. the chinese come back to show what technological capability they have. show economic might and demonstrate to the world that they, too, can be tech knoll onlyicly advanced. they can use it as a stepping moon. >> we must be able to learn more with current technology than what we had the in '70s. >> some at nasa say china's mission could interfere with nasa's probe orbiting the meal. >> with the, the mission sent up in september is studying the exosphere, the environment around the moon and the dust on the surface of the moon. any disturbance of either of those environments could throw a monkey wrench into the satellite. the ro propellant as it makes its way down to the surface will put a lander on the surface, the propellant that slows down the environment will pollute the environment. the principal scientist is not happy. it presents another alternative, and that is we can study how quickly the propel ants dissipate out of the environment. >> it will be exciting to have anything on the moon after a long time. >> the show may be over on the website, facebook or check check >> excessive spee
and hubble telescope, are you developing technology to take you further. >> we're like a baby who just learned to crawl. we need to learn how to walk and then to run. we've really taken the first steps so far. the telescopes we have can find small planets but they can't tell us what is inside the planet, the atmosphere and if there are signs of life on that. with that we need to go to the next generation of space telescope. >> it's alfas nating, but are you going to have the money, the fuel for this technology, for the invasion, are you going to have the money for the work you do in the years to come, the decade to come given that we live in these pretty austere times right now. >> the future is to be determined as you know. and it is true in some ways some people consider this a luxury science. other people have the vision to see that innovation is what keeps our incarceration ahead of the rest of the world. we need to keep that spirit alive. funding things like research will lead to all sorts of applications we can't even dream of. >> you're a dreamer. you lady a team of dreamers. it
and facilities. it falls on municipalities for finding solutions and technology is playing a leading role. this is the future of elderly care. a machine that lives with you in your own home. it keeps an eye on you and relatives and the medical help are just a click away. giraffe louse you to virtuallily enter the home vie a computer and internet. and conduct a visit. >> if i were your granny, what would you do for me? >> take care of people and live independently. >> can granny gets tired can she just say good-bye? >> she can say good-bye. >> see you later. >> different electronic care solution he for the elderly and the giraffe is one of the popular ones. >> people above 80 started to tell me a lot of situations why they could be more independent, where they could gain integrity. if they could have a giraffe in their home. >> inventions like the giraffe are saving money for swedish health care system. money essential for the future care of an aging population. linda lynnvey, al jazeera sweden. >> and that is it and for me the rest of the team in europe. now it's back to doreen in doha. >
. it calls on local municipalities to find creative solutions, and technology is playing a leading role. this is the future of elderly care. a machine that lives with you in your own home. it keeps an eye on you and relatives and medical help are just a click away. giraffe allows you to enter a home from the computer via the internet and conduct visits with your loved ones. if i was your granny what can you do for me? >> take a look at the kitchen and look at the counter and sink and see if this person is able to take care of themselves and live independently. >> if granny gets tired of you, can she say good-bye. >> she can say good-bye. >> see you later. they have been using different electronic care solutions for the elderly, and the giraffe is one of the popular ones. >> people started to tell me a lot of situations where they could be more i understand pnt and gain integrity if they could have this giraffe in their home. >> reporter: inventions like the giraffe are saving money for the swedish health care system, money essential for the future care of the aging population. al jazeer
want a united venezuela. >>> technology companies are demanding, surveillance, written have written an open letter to president barack obama and the congress saying we understand government has a duty to protect their citizens but this summer's revelations, highlighted the need to release government surveillance worldwide. they went on to add the balance has slipped on the way to the state and away from the individual, this undermines the freedomfreedoms we all cherish. and it's also emerged that some of those same companies and their customers have been infiltrated by intelligence agencies. microsoft's x box live network was one of them. under cover officers allegedly used games like world of war craft and second life to scout out potential informants. checked communications between millions of x box gamers. shi has more. >> the more we learn about the scale of the national security agency stages, the less likely we're to trust them. they are calling for the end of bulk data collection, after hoovering up of our international usage, around also more transparency and accountability
to be sharing in cost and technology. the potential issue would be with the frequent flier program right? which is going to be about 100 million people in the new combined entity. by the way delta was number 1, now they become number 1. i think biggest issue we have to grapple with, is what is to become of that? i just got a letter the next year for american is going to be business as usual. same thing for u.s. air. i think it is going to be several months -- >> can i propose something a bigger issue for folks? jarrod, are we likely to see higher ticket prices? >> this is a great statistic, a lot of folks have asked me that the last couple of weeks. did you know ticket prices are down 50% since 1980, can according to airlines for america, they are a good outfit, 50% decrease, by the way gas prices are up 35% and there has been a ton of consolidation. what will lead to higher ticket prices is oil. and if oil prices rise, if diesel prices rise, which is basically what jet fuel is that's where you're going to see the rise in ticket prices in my opinion. >> i'm going to jump ahead. give me your ide
railroad had a particular technology that monitors the brakes and keeps it from going against the speed limit and more on that in the 7:00 hour. >> thank you. sunday's derailment is the third time this year that metro north is the subject of an ntsb investigation and they are looking into metro north safety procedures after two previous accidents. on may 17 more than 70 people were injured when a metro north train derailed in bridge port, connecticut and struck by another train and two weeks later a man was killed under construction and we will hear more about the derailment investigation. decision day for detroit and a federal judge is expected to announce if the city is eligible for bankruptcy protection and the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in u.s. history and we are joining you from detroit to explain and this is just not about corporate debt movering and could hit residents very hard, couldn't it? >> that is right thomas, good morning to you, there are retirees who used to work for the city and right now they are on edge and i talked to a lot of legal experts about this case
lecavalier mr medicine is going to take off. we are moving on to genome sequencing tec technologies thee getting cheaper and cheaper and that is going to affect healthcare and we need to figure out how to do it in a safe and responsible way. >> we appreciate you joining us. thanks very much. >> what makes for a good biography. >> kitty her book capturing camelot. has iconic images of the kennedys. >> it's a departure of those it feet your features jfk kitty kelly joining joins us from washington, d.c. your first major tell all was jackie. >> that's right. why lead you down this road and why choose jackie? >> i have been absolutely fascinated by jackie kennedy. >> i didn't think it was possible to write a biography about her that would be news worthy. because th at the time i tried o do it there was 43 books written on her. i infe interviewed a lot of peoe close to the family and close to mrs. onassis which she was at the time i wrote it. i believe writing an unauthorized biography. unauthorized does not mean untrue. it means you are doing it without the subject's cooperation or approval.
need to do to make us better, that fits our needs. >> and it is leadier in health care and technology. pittsburgh does tunes the huge wealth -- >> thank you very much. three wickets, could have been better in the final session of three. after some ill tempered exchanges in the first half, no less competitive this i'mout. >> we still hate each other's guts. [ laughter ] >> i told michael clarke i'd rip his ears off. this is also going to be a bit of a niggle. >> a lot's being said, but i don't think that either side is upset about it. it was pretty good. i didn't really see, you know excessive sledging or anything like that. it's still very competitive, but you expect that. >> >> no oh current new zealand players are being investigated. no games placed in new zealand are being investigated. no matches are being investigated. >> new zealand on the field are in a good position. they are following on, still trailed by more than 200 runs. >> manchester united david moises doing his best, beaten 1-0 by his former club. edmonton with their first win at united in 20 years. they are 12 points
comfortable home. and eats putar technology enterprise zone, where tax rates are low and creativity is high. >> they left sill can valley for this city famous for its steel. >> . >> there's reasons to stay. >> it is the pittsburgh miracle. it became year in the 80's, market portions working to replace the steel industry, through regulation and a partnership between government, industry, and universities the city clawed back. >> i cannot recall pittsburgh saying they want to be like somebody else. >> the history is always busiest loyal to their hometown, helped them become a leadner healthcare. >> to celebrate it, they are going to indicate the success, so much as a last of failure, pittsburgh rates 50 second out of the u.s.' 100 largest cities. based on job growth, unemployment, y.d.p. and home prices. >> such a huge disparities of wealth, that plague modern america. the try reveals failure. emotional leaders he says only a national plan to get jobs and equitable growth will do. >> 2500 homeless children in this area. you have an infant mortality right among the african-american population
in handcuffs. >> now the innovative technology that can spot a stolen car parked in the middle of a city block. >> there were multiple gunshots fired. >> it can track a gunman thousands of miles away. >> if you can track it then you can predict it. >> moving to east asia, china and japan are fighting over islands in the east china sea and now south korea is in the mention. seoul has claimed air space of water beijing says it owns. here is the story >> reporter: south korea's announcement may be about invisible lines in the air but they extend over disputed areas of land and sea. this is what south korea calls yodo, a submerged rocky reef, home to a science station and under it's de facto control. these strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seuol. >> south korea has asserted rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this zone includes the air space over iado's waters. >> seuol's move comes two wheys a
to be a doctor. >> he wants to be an information technology. >> there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate, but to graduate, students only need 30% on their exams, a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> in the end of the 12 years study, about 60% of those young people have fallen out of the system, so it also has to do with the curriculum. it has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had. >> schools are still struggling with the legend of apartheid. this generation is bearing the scars of the system much longer than nelson mandela imagined. >> the world economic forum of switzerland ranked south africa 146 out of one fought eight countries in education, ranking last in mathematics and science. >> officials in singapore are cleaning up after a riot. crowds attacked police and set cars on fire. dozens were injured and 27 people arrested. it is the first riot in more than four decades. >> it's a police car under attack. the crowd eventually overturns a vehicle, others they set on fire.
and they felled to th they felled to the ground. >> the technology known for the military applications the argument has been set settled. he has never flown lis his coptr for breaking news but he puts them in the sky for corporate customers instead. we have a range of clients from rolls royce. when it comes to drones they want to mute putted put a camers never been before. we are much more responsive. >> a lot of news organization also pay for access at the roof of the building to send up a helicopter that is hundreds of dollars. the model that i use is a few hundred dollars and can be flown with a mobile app the cost is i very low. journalists have run into the long arm of the law. in june a south after african film maker was arrested for flying a drone around where nelson mandela was taken. >> a photographer flew his drone over the wall at a celebrity wedding. in both cases the journalists were criticized and could drones give image hungry news hounds another way to dog their targets. from above? >> heehe advised me what if the paparazzi get these. one, they already have them there a
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